Tong Qiu

Tong Qiu

Assistant Professor

Duke University

I am a broadly trained ecologist interested in understanding how terrestrial ecosystems are functioning in the context of global change. Specifically, my research program seeks to understand the causes and consequences of biodiversity change at scales spanning from individual organisms to the entire biosphere. In pursuit of these goals, I develop data-model synthesis frameworks that integrate satellite remote sensing, airborne LiDAR and hyperspectral imaging, field sampling, and ecological monitoring networks with Bayesian hierarchical models. A key area of my work involves quantifying the regeneration potentials of global forests and their fundamental roles in food web dynamics, including seed production and seedling recruits, and determining how they respond to climate, habitat, species traits, and the consumers that rely on them. Additionally, I develop novel approaches to characterize habitats using satellite and airborne remote sensing, and then use statistical models to predict how these habitats modulate the impacts of climate change on biodiversity.

I worked as a postdoc with Dr. Jim Clark and Dr. Jennifer Swenson at the Nicholas School of Environment at Duke University. For my doctoral research, I worked with Drs. Conghe Song, Jim Clark, Erika Wise, Diego Riveros-Iregui, and Allen Hurlbert to understand how vegetation phenology is influenced by climate change, extreme weather events, and urbanization.

Interests
  • Global change ecology
  • Biodiversity
  • Tree fecundity
  • Vegetation phenology
  • Bayesian hierarchical models
Education
  • Ph.D. in Physical Geography, 2020

    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

  • B.Eng. in Remote Sensing, 2015

    Wuhan University (with the highest honor, GPA ranking 1/229)

Xiaolu is interested in the interactions between plant phenology, terrestrial ecosystems, and the climate system. She uses a combination of ground observations, remote sensing records, statistical models, and Earth system models to (1) characterize the biodiversity-phenology-climate relationship and how it influences ecosystem structure and reproduction; (2) assess phenology variability and improve phenology modeling in Earth system models; and (3) investigate phenology impacts on land-atmosphere interactions. She worked with Dr. Toby R. Ault for her postdoctoral and dissertation research work.

Interests
  • Vegetation Phenology
  • Earth System Models
  • Land-atmosphere coupling
  • Remote Sensing
Education
  • Ph.D. in Atmospheric Sciences, 2019

    Cornell University

  • M.A. in Geography, 2014

    University of Minnesota

  • B.S. in Geography and B.A. in Economics, 2012

    Peking University

Hanshi Chen

Hanshi Chen

Ph.D. student

Pennsylvania State University

Hanshi is a Ph.D. student in the Intercollege Graduate Degree Program (IGDP) in Ecology. Her research interests focus on understanding the effects of climate and habitat change on vegetation phenology across broad biogeogragraphic scales. She is also interested in quantifying the subsequent impact of phenology changes on terrestrial ecosystem functions and services. She worked with Dr. Weiqiang Chen and Dr. Hua Cai at the Institute of Urban Environment at Chinese Academy of Sciences from 2021 to 2023 before joining Penn State.

Interests
  • Vegetation phenology
  • Climate changes
  • Ecosystem service evaluation
  • LiDAR remote sensing
Education
  • M.Eng. in Environmental Planning and Management, 2021

    National Taiwan University

  • B.S. in Geographic Information Science, 2019

    Fujian Normal University

Yu Wei is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Ecosystem Science and Management. She is interested in understanding biodiversity changes using combined LiDAR and hyperspectral remote sensing. Her research projects seeks to apply deep learning and other advanced computing models to understand structural and spectral diversity of forest ecosystem under global change. She has a very strong background in remote sensing and worked with Dr. Mi Wang at the State Key Laboratory of Information Engineering in Surveying Mapping and Remote Sensing (LIESMARS) at Wuhan University.

Interests
  • Forest biodiversity
  • Hyperspectral remote sensing
  • Structural diversity
  • Deep learning
Education
  • M.Eng. in Remote Sensing, 2023

    Wuhan University

  • B.Eng. in Remote Sensing, 2020

    Wuhan University

Finan Turnage-Barney

Finan Turnage-Barney

Undergraduate research assistant

Pennsylvania State University

Fin is an undergraduate research assistant/technician in the lab. His main role is working on a new seed dispersal project and small unmanned aircraft operations for imagery and LIDAR data creation along with processing and analyzing that data.

Interests
  • Nature resources conservation
  • Drone piloting
  • Forest and soil
Education
  • B.S. in Geography, 2024 (expected)

    Pennsylvania State University

Alumni

Evan Hackett - former undergraduate summer intern